St. Croix

St. Croix River

St. Croix

Natural Heritage

The designation recognizes the St. Croix River’s representation of Atlantic Canada’s geology, its rare plant species, its bald eagle and osprey habitat, and its provincially significant fossil deposits.

Cultural Heritage

The St. Croix’s connection to thousands of years of First Nations history contributed to its designation as a Canadian Heritage River. The Passamaquoddy and other First Peoples have lived along the river for more than 4000 years.

The river’s remarkable history includes the site of the first European settlement in North America north of Florida, established in 1604 on Ile de St. Croix (at the mouth of the river) by Samuel de Champlain.

The designation also recognizes the river’s association with the 19th and early 20th century lumber industry and with the development of the railways in the region.

Recreational Heritage

The St. Croix River is known as an easily accessible backcountry recreational experience for paddlers and fishermen of all abilities. Campsites are found all along the length of the river.

The river marks the international boundary between New Brunswick and the State of Maine in the USA. Since 2001, the one-country camping system has been in place, requiring paddlers to make landfall only in the country in which they will begin and end their journey. Paddlers are advised to familiarize themselves with Canadian and US marine reporting requirements prior to beginning a trip.

Who Manages the River?

The river is managed by the St. Croix International Waterway Commission (SCIWC) (LINK), which receives support from the Province of New Brunswick. The SCIWC manages the waterway via an internationally agreed management plan.

Fun Fact:

The rich history of the lumber industry on the river is told in the names of campsites and the “rips” – logs and rings that still linger on the riverbed. Keen-eyed travellers can spot the original surveyor’s posts that mark the Canadian-American boundary.

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